1955 mercedes 300 slr




1955 mercedes 300 slr

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  • Picture this. It's and Mercedes is dominating the motorsport scene with the Sport Light-Racing (SLR) race car, achieving a superb

    In Mercedes-Benz developed the SLR race car for Grand Prix racing - in it captured the world championship. Meanwhile, the.

    Mercedes-Benz SLR. The development of the SLR racing sports car was heavily influenced by the Mercedes SL with striking.

    1955 mercedes 300 slr

    1955 mercedes 300 slr

    The three-dimensional tubular steel frame required more room underneath the doors than earlier constructions, which meant that the doorways had to be moved further up. The Mercedes-Benz SLR was planned for the season, and the company already had entered it in the Le Mans hour race, but then withdrew it at short notice - the car wasn't ready yet. To reduce crank flexing, power takeoff was from the center of the engine via a gear rather than at the end of the crankshaft. The model right was first introduced at the Geneva Motor Show in March , when, with a top speed of mph it was one of the fastest cars of its time. While the design is impressive and easy to use, the game line up is disappointing.

    1955 mercedes 300 slr

    1955 mercedes 300 slr

    1955 mercedes 300 slr

    1955 mercedes 300 slr

    1955 mercedes 300 slr

    Mercedes-Benz SLR | Review | COMESEEORLANDO.INFO

    The development of the SLR racing sports car was heavily influenced by the Mercedes SL with striking gullwing doors, which first lined up at the start of the Mille Miglia in and a road-going version of which made its debut in February It was this famous model which provided the basic concept for the new racer, featuring a lightweight but high-strength tubular steel frame supporting an aluminium body. However, the SLR also stood out with a host of individual characteristics very much its own.

    These included a five-speed transmission, inch wheels and larger brakes. The displacement of the Formula 1 eight-cylinder power unit was increased from 2. This boosted out-put to as much as hp at rpm, depending on the intake manifold. Maximum torque of Newtonmetres at rpm ensured quite majestic pulling power. The hugely powerful engine was mounted longitudinally in the front section of the car at an angle of 33 degrees and supplied with a high-octane fuel mixture of low-lead petrol 65 percent and benzol 35 percent.

    1955 mercedes 300 slr

    In some races, alcohol was also used to push performance up to even greater heights. As a rule, the racing sports car roared off the starting line with litres of fuel and 35 litres of oil on board.

    However, Moss and Jenkinson began their assault on the Mille Miglia with as much as litres of fuel in the tank. The Stuttgart-based engineers organised a series of uncompromising test runs in order to establish the durability of the eight-cylinder unit. It was put through its paces over a distance of more than 10, kilometres at race speed, before being subjected to a hour non-stop test rig examination. These were merciless tests of endurance, but they were still not enough to break the W S engine.

    1955 mercedes 300 slr

    This exhaustive and extremely intensive programme of testing was a key element in the preparation for endurance road races such as the Mille Miglia, Tourist Trophy and Targa Florio, where the reliability and durability of the materials was an even more important factor than raw speed. The empirical values gained from pre-season testing paid dividends for the Mercedes team and helped earn the SLR a formidable reputation: Behind the development of the SL between and and the construction of the successful SLR racing sports car was the inspiration of a man who was to become known as the technical brains behind the Silver Arrows: Born in London on July 15, and the son of a German banker, Uhlenhaut grew up in a multilingual environment.

    He began his career in in the testing department at Daimler-Benz, becoming technical director of the racing department in and rising to senior engineer and head of passenger-car testing in Uhlenhaut was an engineer with petrol in his blood, but was also a skilled driver. For example, during chassis testing with the Formula 1 racing car at Hockenheim in , he bettered Fangios best time by 3. However, he never really considered driving in the races himself, instead preferring to direct operations behind the scenes.

    In addition to his specialist expertise, Uhlenhaut was frequently called on to display a well-honed talent for improvisation. Once such instance occurred during the Carrera Panamericana. With Mercedes driver John Cooper Fitch complaining that excessive force was required to brake effectively in his SL, Uhlenhaut got down on his hands and knees underneath a service truck, plucked out its brake force booster and promptly fitted it into the SL. Fitch was a happy man again.

    1955 mercedes 300 slr

    When the decision was made mid-way through to build a new Mercedes road-going sports car, Rudolf Uhlenhaut was there to give the project — known by the abbreviation SL Sport Light — the necessary impetus. His was the engineering mind behind the space frame, made by welding together filigreed steel profiles, which supported the engine, transmission and axles. In the development of the frame, he drew on the knowledge gained in the design of a tried-and-tested invention which has itself acted as a kind of supporting framework through the history of motor racing.

    In the immediate post-war period Uhlenhaut, who had previously played a major role in the success of the Silver Arrows between and , designed a series of smaller racing cars with rear-mounted engines in which he incorporated a wide tubular frame, the central section of which formed a high-strength triangular construction in front of the cockpit.

    DRIVING MY 1955 MERCEDES 300SL IN MONACO



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