Bmw turbo concept




Bmw turbo concept

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  • Previewing the iconic M1, the Turbo will go down in history as BMW's first concept car. It had pop-up headlights up front and dual BMW badges.

    Adrian van Hooydonk, Senior Vice President BMW Group Design, gives some insights and explains the ideas behind the BMW Turbo concept.

    A new Chief-Designer came to BMW in the s. Over a period of six years, Frenchman Paul Braque created a series of cars. This car, the Braque Turbo, was p.

    The concept car concept is translated as "the idea of a car". This is a kind of prototype car, which tests people's reactions to new technologies being introduced, design solutions, etc. In its original form, prototypes are never launched into mass production.

    Bmw turbo concept

    Bmw turbo concept

    The BMW Turbo included a raft of innovations which drivers take for granted today. After receiving the proverbial stamp of approval from the execs, Bracq envisioned the Turbo with pop-up headlights, spectacular gullwing doors, and partially covered rear wheels. It was displayed to commemorate the M1's 30th anniversary alongside a brand new wedge-shaped, but not operational concept, fittingly dubbed the 'M1 Hommage'. Luxury and sports car makes are increasingly launching SUVs to their well-heeled clients. Progressive safety crumple zones regained their shape after minor collisions thanks to solid, foamed U-sections fitted to hydraulic dampers at the front and rear of the car.

    Bmw turbo concept

    Bmw turbo concept

    Bmw turbo concept

    Bmw turbo concept

    Bmw turbo concept

    BMW Turbo - Wikipedia

    BMW presented the Turbo in as the world's first safety-oriented sports car. And this research laboratory on wheels allowed a glimpse into the future with innovations which were gradually to fi nd their way into series production.

    In the early s, the BMW Turbo provided a stunningly sleek riposte to the prevailing wave of ponderous safety prototypes and their bulky add-ons. This was a time when manufacturers were even testing roll bars fixed above the painted bodywork.

    Bmw turbo concept

    The Turbo saw BMW go firmly on the offensive — and reinforce the school of thought that 'only clearly structured, agile and manoeuvrable cars really have a genuine chance of making it' in the future. The fresh design penned by Paul Bracq, head designer at BMW at the time, opened up a whole new dimension in the debate surrounding safety and gave the public a preview of the BMW M1 sports car to be launched in The second Turbo was produced with minor modifications in July and unveiled for the first time at the company's annual general meeting.

    It also caused quite a stir at the International Motor Show in Frankfurt. The BMW Turbo was a technological test case and styling concept in one. The design of the car made safety a priority, Bracq ushering in a completely new and pioneering way of thinking for the basic conception of the modern car.

    Bmw turbo concept

    The designer explained how his approach put the human element at the heart of the development process: Today we build cars from the inside out. The machine we drive should represent an intimate human cell. A car should fit us like a second skin. Wolfgang Seehaus and Hans A.

    Muth were heavily involved in the interior design process. Support for the driver. BMW used the Turbo to present a number of driver assistant systems for the first time. The new technology was designed to warn and support the driver in extreme situations. The Turbo's basic concept provided the motorist with an inherent layer of safety padding. A low centre of gravity, wide contact area, specially developed chassis and driver-oriented cockpit were all designed to make critical situations a seldom experienced eventuality.

    If things did get a bit hairy, the driver assistance systems fitted on the BMW Turbo, such as ABS, the radar-based distance warning device and lateral acceleration sensor, were there to save the day.

    Bmw turbo concept

    Should an accident be unavoidable, however, the driver would be protected by an extensive range of passive safety features. These included safety belts which had to be put on before the car would start, a safety steering column with three universal joints, door pillars reaching up into the roof — which performed the function of a roll bar — and safety crumple zones with hydraulic dampers at the front and rear. The driver takes centre stage.

    Stage by stage, the safety features unveiled in the Turbo were fed into series-embodied another new philosophy, as a press release explained: Another notable feature of the BMW Turbo was the 'secondary display 2' — a precursor to Check Control, which checked the functioning of safety-related systems using glass-fibre optics. With the ignition switched on, both the CS and CSi allowed the driver to check the following functions by pressing the 'Test' button: The functions covered by Check Control have since been extended significantly and Check Control has been fitted as standard in all BMWs since the early s.

    BMW V12 TURBO 1378 HP / 1566 NM (1155 lbs) CSI 850



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