1948 chrysler town and country convertible




1948 chrysler town and country convertible

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  • Results 1 - 15 of 25 We are pleased to offer this Chrysler Town & Country for consideration. The ''woodie'' convertible is a rare find, and especially rare in.

    Understandably, this was Chrysler's top-of-the-line vehicle and the pinnacle of post-war glamour. The Town and Country was a dazzling expression of status.

    In , Stewart Kennedy and his wife, Catherine Baker, acquired this Town and Country Convertible from an owner on the east coast of the United States.

    1948 chrysler town and country convertible

    1948 chrysler town and country convertible

    It was distinguished by luxury features including a carpeted loadfloor trimmed with chrome strips, and from forward, woodgrain paneling on the body sides and tailgate, a feature also associated with somewhat competitive top-shelf station wagons such as the AMC Ambassador , Buick Estate , Oldsmobile Custom Cruiser , Ford Country Squire , and the Mercury Colony Park. But at Chrysler, the beloved Town and Country moniker would take on new roles in new market segments. November Learn how and when to remove this template message. Town and Country for borrowed most of its exterior trim from the New Yorker. After considerable trial and error, engineers devised a conventional cowl and floor section for the woody convertible, with a surrounding steel beltline and the rear fenders tied together by a steel shelf.

    1948 chrysler town and country convertible

    1948 chrysler town and country convertible

    1948 chrysler town and country convertible

    1948 chrysler town and country convertible

    1948 chrysler town and country convertible

    RM Sotheby's - Chrysler Town and Country Convertible | Amelia Island

    It was offered in both Windsor and New Yorker variants through the end of Windsor model production after the model year, and then in Newport and New Yorker models through After that, it was a model in its own right, with trim and features which bridged the gap between the two sedan lines. It was distinguished by luxury features including a carpeted loadfloor trimmed with chrome strips, and from forward, woodgrain paneling on the body sides and tailgate, a feature also associated with somewhat competitive top-shelf station wagons such as the AMC Ambassador , Buick Estate , Oldsmobile Custom Cruiser , Ford Country Squire , and the Mercury Colony Park.

    Town and Country, however, stood in a class by itself until the last of the full-sized versions of From , it was sized down and absorbed into the LeBaron series, with a lesser version lacking the more luxurious features and the woodgrain bodyside decals available for a few years in the early s. It used the roof of the concurrent Chrysler Imperial 4-door 8-passenger limousine, which led to a rear loading configuration with wooden double doors also called 'Barrel Back' doors that opened out from the center beneath the fixed backlight rear window.

    1948 chrysler town and country convertible

    Less than one-thousand units had been produced since the vehicle's introduction a year earlier. The Crosley Hot Shot is often given credit for the first production disc brakes but the Chrysler Imperial Crown actually had them first as standard equipment at the start of the model year.

    Joseph, Michigan , under patents of inventor H. Lambert, and was first tested on a Plymouth. The Ausco-Lambert disc brake was complex, and because of the expense, the brakes were only standard on the Chrysler Crown Imperial through and the Town and Country Newport in This wagon introduced several firsts, including roll-down rear windows for tailgates for and rear-facing third row seats for The New Yorker version disappeared for , but reappeared for when the Saratoga series was dropped.

    1948 chrysler town and country convertible

    The Windsor version lasted through , then was moved to the new Newport series for ; the New Yorker edition continued through For model years through , the New Yorker Town and Country remained on the inch wheelbase, while first the Windsor then the Newport Town and Country models rode a wheelbase of inches. These were the roomiest factory-bodied, automobile-based station wagons on the market at the time. Six roof pillar hardtop styling was available on these cars.

    These were the first large wagons, and among the largest automobiles ever built, with unibody construction. For , all Chrysler models including New Yorker standardized on the shorter Newport inch wheelbase. Both New Yorker and Newport trim level Town and Country wagons continued as four-door hardtops through , making Chrysler the last American station wagons offered in this short-lived configuration. Powertrains and standard equipment remained familiar. A hp 4-BBL cu. V8 with 3-speed synchromesh transmission and floor shifter.

    Both continued to offer 6 and 9 passenger variants, plus a long list of optional equipment. The New Yorker remained unique among large American wagons, offering the option of bucket front seats with center cushion and folding armrest. The unitized body and chassis, with longitudinal front torsion bars and rear leaf springs carried over from the prior generation. Automatic transmission equipped cars dropped the dashboard pushbutton shift control, and converted to the new industry standard PRNDL sequence shift lever, either column or floor mounted.

    1948 chrysler town and country convertible

    Dodge and Chrysler models shared passenger compartment structures, thus interior dimensions were essentially identical. Thin pillars and tall glass shared with 4 door sedans made for generous space and outward visibility. Straight roof rails on the long roof rack had adjustable cross bars. All Newport models including wagons had a larger standard engine for New Yorker wagons continued to feature the cu.

    Both trim levels were available in 6 or 9 passenger versions. However, this was the last year that wagons would be available in either New Yorker or Newport trim levels. Exterior trim was similar to the Newport series, with unique taillights. The vinyl bench seat interior shared features with both the Newport and New Yorker series, with the front seat center armrest standard, and simulated woodgrain on the dashboard, resulting in a level of standard trim intermediate between the two sedan series.

    1948 Chrysler Town and Country Convertible



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